About your Search

20130828
20130828
SHOW
News 14
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 30
SFGTV2 24
MSNBCW 21
CNNW 17
KGO (ABC) 11
SFGTV 11
FBC 10
CNBC 9
KPIX (CBS) 7
CSPAN 6
KTVU (FOX) 6
CSPAN2 5
KNTV (NBC) 5
KQED (PBS) 5
KCSM (PBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 202
French 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 205 (some duplicates have been removed)
youer is if we have a comprehensive report about all of the, all of the teacher america impacts on all of the schools in the district, as you know, i have recently, raised the issue about certain schools, where they are and by the way it is not a secret. because teacher america tells all of the graduates and all of the funders and the public this. what we are doing is getting ourselves into all of the parts of the school districts. we want to take over this and take over that. and there are schools in our district where there are administrators and teacher of america graduate and they are biased in favor of teacher of america graduate and they go to events where they say, okay, teacher for america graduates now that you are an administrative positions we want you to focus on hiring teach for america interns and so i want you to tell us how much of that we are we have in our school district so that we can know that it is not just a sort of silent creeping take over if we were going to do it, somebody is going to have tell me, that we want to have this company do this for and yous that f
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
news at the top of every hour. thanks for watching. [[voiceover]] there's more to america. more stories. more voices. more points of view. >>from our headquarters in new york ... [[voiceover]] now there's a news channel with more of what americans want to know. >>i'm ali velshi, and this is real money. >>this is america tonight. >>our news coverage, reporting, and documentaries explore, inspire, and reveal more of america's stories. >>i'm here to investigate genetically modified salmon. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >>a. >> >> >>> we were just talking about consumer confidence, a big one-day drop in the stock market may not erode your confidence in this economy, but a big oil spike will. stocks tumbled on tuesday with the dow closing down more than 170 points for the d
in school innovation and a small grant with each for america, the partner was in similar ways that we are doing with the other schools with the new teacher center around building capacity, to support and retain, our highly qualified teachers. and so this is a non-traditional, very small contract with tfa that actually is about helping us change the paradyme, the tsa board asked me to come and speak on richard's behalf, probably six or seven months ago and talked about how they want to shift the relationship that they have with the districts from just staffing people with tsa teachers to really looking at how they can be a supportive partner around all of the leadership development activities for the teachers and this was an opportunity for us with the sales force grant, who also really wanted to promote the partnership work and look at different ways of partnering with tsa and who does have an interest in our school district and being a partner, but in a different way than they have in the past. so we felt, the superintendent and i, and others working on this felt that this was a good
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
, in this place, at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation. and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined. and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is
changed america. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prove if i unmatched in our time. >> i have a dream. >> they opened minds. they melted hearts. >> we must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. >> that was the spirit of young people like john lewis brought to that day. >> and america is that promised land for all of us. >> in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in. >> because they kept marching. america changed. >> and yes, eventually the white house changed. >> free at last, free at last. thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm ed schultz. "the ed show." we're here monday through friday 5:00 eastern. today was a big day of emotion for this country. a day of record, a day of reflection. to me, you know what, i am so feeling so good about inside is because i think today was a day of learning for a lot of americans. there are a lot of american who's weren't alive 50 years ago today that kind of wondered what this was all about. and the neat thing about it all is that you can't change the f
the great progress of the past 50 years in america that allows him to be president, that how much hard work we have to come. and it will end up being a speech about economic justice, not just freedom. >> pelley: now we were looking, of course, at the black and white pictures of the day in 1963. there are a quarter of a million people, it is estimated, on the national mall on that day. certainly today there are fewer people at this eventment but a very large crowd, nonetheless here to hear, here to listen to the president who will be speaking in just another moment. the official title of the event in 1963 was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. jobs was the number one thing on that list. and the president today is expected to talk about that, that a great deal of progress has been made in terms of the rights of all americans and the legal rights of all americans. but that in terms of the economy and jobs, not enough progress has been made. it's an interesting point that about three times more african-americans live below the poverty level than white americans. and that was the same
. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their team. >> reporter: it's at the edge of locust grove high school football field just out of atlanta, where glen jones has the best view. his son was forrest jones, number 71 on the football team. drive. >> he was a hard worker. he just went aft
want to know is a review of all of the contracts that we have with the teach for america, further i would like to know how much administrators and how many teach for america teachers and other staff people that we have in each school. which will tell us what the profile is, of those teachers in the schools that have teach for america graduates as administrators. or a departments that have it. i am not asked for that, i don't know what, you know the board may want to discuss this whole issue. i am only say that this is something that i would like to know and i think from our earlier discussion, that there is consensus on the board that we would like to know that because when i raised that issue before, there was and there were other members of the board who said, yeah that would be good to know. >> commissioner murase? >> i would be interested in the kind of data that she has asked for but i want to remind my colleagues that there was a committee meeting last year, twr (inaudible) presented a lot of very detailed data comparing teach for america teachers performance with non-teach fo
heart. he wanted white america to see what they were doing. he wanted white america to see how hurtful it was. >> the letter was a national call to the conscience of america using real life, real time reality of birmingham as it's template. birmingham then became the spark that ignited the prairie fire of negro existence that was transformed into negro revolution. >> today thousands of people are expected to be in washington to celebrate the legacy of martin luther king jr. joining us now from a los angeles, president of the beverly hills hollywood branch naacp and member of the national board. thank you for being with us today. >> thank you for having me here, morgan. >> president obama is going to speak at the exact spot where dr. martin luther king spoke 50 years ago today. what do you hope to hear him say? >> well, i'm sure, and i hope that he will talk about the progress that we as america has made, and we as african-americans have really looked forward to in terms of being able to relate to society in terms of the progress that it has offered to people of color, black, other race
that is their intrigue and controversy. we'll travel to the corner of america on a list of outlaws, the so-called "amish mafia". >>> how does this guy make $4 billion? well, you could say he brings new life to the common vacuum cleaner. meet a self-made man whose mantra is home making. >>> and military strikes possible against syria, convinced that the regime released deadly nerve gas against its own people. tonight, we have the latest. >>> keep it right here, america. "nightline" is back in just 60 seconds. >> from new york city, this is "nightline" with bill weir. >>> thank you for joining us, in this media age if you go on national television and insult any one group of americans from presbyterians to pole vaulters, there will be heck to pay, unless you go to the amish. now there is a show blowing up everything we thought we knew about these humble folk. it claims to have a sub culture that keeps them in life. abc's lindsay davis went into their quaint corner of america to find out. >> reporter: here in lancaster, pennsylvania, the amish here live like they have for decades, simply and humbly. but be
in this place at this time 50 years ago today dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation, and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it is an opportunity today t
presence in least, in latin america, and venezuela, in the united states some have been caught smoking across the bord border. maybe doing some things again u.s. interest, other places in the world those present bigger problems for us we try to protect not only military and diplomatic interests but commercial interests has. >> thank you so much colonel bill cowen. >> thank you, lori. >> we'll have more on obama administration handling of conflict in syria later with our a team. >> on a historic anniversary, first black president shares his dream of equality in america. analyzing president obama's speech, and state of race relations in america next. lori: on wall street stocks rebounding after two days of losses, dow closed with a gain the 48, and nazdaq rose 15. 2. 7 billion shares traded hands today. precious metal, gold falling $140 an ounce after a run -- $ 1.40 an ounce after yesterday's run-up, crude oil settles just botcabove $110 a barrel. check bond market, shield on 10-year note 2.78%. falling yesterday in the safe a half know play. it is a historic day in washington, presiden
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscious of a nation and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom, injustice, equality, and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today to recall wher
of an america where all citizens would sit together at the table of brotherhood. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. >> good afternoon. i'm tamron hall. 50 years and nearly two generations and here we stand, a nation reflecting on one of the greatest moments in our history. and a guiding light for our future. the faces of those carrying the torch lit by dr. martin luther king jr. were back today, retraitsing the steps taken by a quarter million americans seeking equality and jobs. it's also today where the first african-american president, arguably the personification of dr. king's dream addressed the crowd in the shadow of greatness. dr. king's speech was incredibly just under 17 minutes long. 1651 words, he was only 34 years old. a speech delivered in a different age at the time carried by just a few networks without the power of the internet or twitter or facebook to help spread that message. it is a speech that the king family closely protects, making sure to preserve the legacy of an iconic leader. now, 50 years later, on this historic ann
bbc world news america. fax britain will wait for you in un inspectors -- acting oning syria. they have sentenced the army psychologist to death for killing 13 people during a rampage in texas. 50 years after martin luther historicvered his speech, president obama stands on the same spot for the commemoration. >> no one can match his brilliance, but we are willing to take our first step for justice. i know that flame remains. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there appears to be a split over when and how to act against syria. the british government says it will wait for a report from inspectors, but the u.s. says action cannot be held up by intransigence. as the world waits to see what the u.s. and its allies will do, syrian neighbors are preparing for repercussions. >> in syria it self the u.n. weapons inspectors have been taking their first look at one of the areas where chemical weapons were supposedly used. senior british officials are .ure americans it is hard to think britain will not be involved, but the british government
black people but also white people. to know that a nation, such as america and the reason i struggle with it so hard because i really believe in the potential of this country. >> actor and civil rights activist harry boll phone -- belafonte. headline this morning the tallahassee democrat, a turning point and a quote from the mlk speech, i have a dream that this country will live out the true meaning of its creed that all men are created equal. our question as we begin on this wednesday morning, do marchs still make a difference? 202-585-3880 those of you under the and of 50. over 50, 202-585-3881. we begin with james joining us from grand fork, north dakota. caller: hey steve. calling again. i'm actually 49. right on the edge and i'm going to be 50. i'm not north dakotaian. i called before and i came out here for work for this hard to be a white man in suburbs of philadelphia. certain trades get displaced and you have to find your own way. i'm out here celebrating. i don't celebrate diversity. i noticed that c-span and msnbc there's an obsession with race. it's funny how white peopl
. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song. >> i don't know about you, b bbu but -- ♪ i woke up with my mind stayed on freedom ♪ >> and even celebrities joined in echoing dr. king's words. >> and as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves how will the dream live on in me and you and all of us? >> and those bells did toll. on the national mall and all over the country, they rang to commemorate dr. king's call to let freedom ring. and then on the very same steps from which dr. king addressed the country decades earlier, president obama brought the point of today home. today is not just about commemorating the dream, but advancing it. because t
.... a government cure for america's drug problem. and... the heat is on .. how the late summer burst of sun is affecting u.s. crops. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas good morning! it's wednesday, august 28. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: the market in crisis mode over syria. the volitility index raced up 12%.. as fear and anxiety strike stocks. the dow plunged in a triple digit fall. the nasdaq had its worst point drop of the year.. and the s&p broke through technical support. gold futures pushed up $23 and oil spiked close to $109 dollars per barrel. jcp posted a record trading day with near 100million shares changing hands. it follows a report-- activist investor bill ackman sold his entire stake the retailer. the stock closed down 18 cents around $13.00. and walgreen is accused of overcharging customers and using false advertising. the lawsuit was filed yesteray by the attornery general of missouri. walgreen will fight the charges. for more on the market reaction to syria, larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us. goo
king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awake and the conscience of a nation and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words res son nated because they were spoken out of an unwavering believe in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today, people from all walks of life will gather at 3 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world, as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. >> we have been listening to oprah at the national mall talking about what happened 50 years ago on the national mall. also there, of course, the president, mr. obama is there he is going to be speaking as well as former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. you can watch all of these events unfold live on our website. just log on any time to see this happening live, nbcbayarea.com.
is author of "the king years" and center of women, politics and public policy and author of "moving america towards justice." taylor, you're a great historian. first let's do this. the president spoke on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and the famous "i have a dream" speech. he paid tribute to the men and women in the front lines only a few of whom such as john lewis are with us today. let's watch the president. >> because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed and yes, eventually the white house changed. because they marched america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans but for women and latinos, asians and native americans, for catholics, jews, and muslims, for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. >> have conservatived in america judged this man by the content of his character? >> absolutely not. conservatives in america talk about conservative politics and use the
, my name is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. arabia for that. ♪ ♪ schwartz: martyn stacey has also been campaigning for tighter controls on adventure tour operators. schwartz: ballooning may appear to be the gentlest of extreme sports but this is a four tonne aircraft with more power than many a light plane and no brakes. a pilot can take the craft up or down but direction is determined by the wind. martyn stacey: "it's a magical experience flying balloons and at different altitudes you get different wind directions and that's how you can control your balloo
were carried out by the rebels. why? well, to drag america and britain and france into the war, and also quite importantly, to derail any chance of these geneva 2 peace talks. >> the flooded city of in china has been strengthened its dikes to prevent more damage. city 30s have also been building new pairiers along roads to ensure the safety of its main residential areas. much of tonjef has been under water. 33,000 people have been relocated. he sent us this update. >> i'm standing at the moment on a secondary embankment, some several hundreds meters away from where the usual bank is. you can see emergency crews have had to reenforce this area, and what they are doing now, is that some of the wattser making its way to the other side of this bank, not because it is overtopping it but because it has been leaking underneath, where we are now, we have come here by boat and a lot of sandbags are being brought here, so just dropping them over the side, trying to plug any leaks. one of the roads we were driving along just simply ended. about 100-kilometers further downstream from here,
valid point. >> thank you, drawing lass, senior national security fellow at the new america foundation. we do appreciate you joining us this morning. >> as the west readies for a possible military attack. u.n. secretary called for a diplomatic resolution, saying give peace and diplomacy a chance, stop acting and start talking. diplomatic he had door james bays joins us. now, a joint u.n. enjoy to syria. >> prime minister cameron and president obama have said leave it to the special envoy, the mediator, he is going to get both sides at the table. now he was asked one specific question. if there is to be a military strike on syria without the approval of the u.n. security council, would that strike be legal. he said under international law, no, it would not. >> the big question though is even after prime minister cameron submits his resolution, will the u.n. security council make a decision anytime soon? >> what you've got going on is one last try with the u.n. security council and diplomacy. two tracks are going on, one the diplomatic track, the british parliament want to show every eff
's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> it's a travesty to think that someone would go to court to take away pension. they worked for this for over 30 years. for someone as governor the state to go against his own constitution to try to take money from these people is a shame. >> well, detroit clearly didn't get into this financial crisis overnight. it's economic decline has been at work for decades. how did detroit get here? >> the city has had bad public policies for decades. economies collapsed, but in the past decade or so they've been bothered by an acute level of mismanagement, not being able to do the basic things that other cities in the state of michigan can do despite getting more revenue and having special rules to give the city more money than any other city in the state of michigan. they can fix that, though. it's not a permanent solutio
of measles in america. while some people are blaming some christian teachings. >>> and a montana teacher is convicted of raping a 14-year-old student. why did the teacher only get 30 days in jail? >>> let's go "outfront." ♪ >> >> i'm jessica yellin in for erin burnett. >>> "outfront" tonight, breaking news, stocks dive as the drumbeat to war with syria gets louder. wall street suffered its worst day since june as the obama administration clearly laid the groundwork for a possible military strike on syria. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. the president believes and i believe that those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable. >> market analyst todd schoenberger is "outfront" with us tonight. thank you for being here. how much of this market drop had to do with what you heard from the vice president and the president and the administration about oil in the region? >> quite a bit because it's a grave concern for everybody at wall street. it was top o
aren't satisfied with the current civil rights leaders in america. here is liberal journalist margaret carlson. >> we've gone from martin luther king to the reverend al sharpton. as a leader as he is trying to be this weekend, it is very d disspiriting. >> probably time for everyone to take crop of where civil rights stands. i asked juan this question as well. do you think he represents the african-american community well, al, that constantly backs the wrong horse? do you think he does them a disservice? >> no, i don't think he represents well. the idea of comparing any black leader with martin luther king is nearly impossible. this was in my view, this is the greatest american maybe since abraham lincoln. i just don't think you can take al sharpton and martin luther king in the same sentence. i know people are dissatisfied. the black community is diffuse whatever it is in the country, usually in pulpits. are blacks better off? some ways they are, some they're not. >> some, greg, don't believe if martin luther king were alive and watching the current civil rights leaders giving speeche
.s. not having an international mandate and the u.s. having to explain all this to voters in america and people around the world. you can sense that there is a new nervousness here. it seems as though they are opening up and realizing the fact that it's not really a question of if anymore but when. that's causing the talk at least amongst some syrian officials. the mood changed considerably here on the ground, piers. >> now cnn obtained this exclusive video by a direct hit from the chemical weapons attack. some of this video is graphic and disturbing. tell us, the latest mood, i guess, that people want to sense is what is president assad's reaction likely to be? >> reporter: that's a very good question. it's probably doubtful there will be any reaction but a lot will depend on what sort of military action is taken. if it's limited, i doubt there will be reaction. i was here when the israelis struck a big weapons depot and a whole mountain was set on fire for days and there was never really any sort of response, any military response. the syrian government knows well that it's air force is no ma
with his sense on however america has come and the work that has been left. ç] >> i have a dream. that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. let freedom ring. >> who can forget those words, those words changed a nation 50 years ago today and the message is one that lives on. take a look back now at that message and what really was the mission behind it. in 1963, dr. martin luther king, jr. was arrested and put in jail in birmingham, alabama, the charge, protesting without a permit. there he writes the famous letter from the birmingham jail that was the moral duty to break unjust laws that images of brutality of broadcast around the world, gaining sympathy thought civil rights movement. naacp field operator medgar evers is murdered outside his home. dr. king gives the speech, that famous i have a dream speech. on july 2, 1964, president johnson signs the civil rights act of 1964, which was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. late
and complacency. murders from urban america to suburban america. the pursuit of power for power's sake. we stand here today to say it is time to wake up. so here in 2013 we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. we look towards the statue of the great liberator. we say we have come to wake up a new civil rights movement. for economic justice. a new civil rights movement for freedom in these days. a new civil rights movement for jobs. a new civil rights movement for men, for women, for children of all background, all races, all dispositions, all orientations, all cities, all counties, all towns, all across america. america it is time to wake up. >> from the naacp, pamela, a new civil rights movement that's something that has to be started at the grassroots level as well. >> there's no question. i nene beauty and magnify sense of the civil rights movement 50 years ago was part of the coalition movement. he understood the issues that real estate late, women issues, gay rights issues, disparity on race, economic issues. bringing alligator of those folks together understanding that it is e
of the dozens of the doesn't. i will discuss. and i always say the stock market is a reflection of us, america, our hopes, our dreams, our hard work and successes, and our failures. even our dispositions. see what stocks in telling us about how we feel about our neighbors. also tonight, we will speakith the ceo of a company in the middle of rebuilding america piece by piece. the story of opportunity and hope and inspiration that just may be a potential investment for your portfolio. so sit up, get off the couch, stop listening to the doomsayers. i believe in outing great american companies, and i know you can make this your market. ♪ charles: few things spook the market as much as uncertainty and anxiety. we have a double those above. the certainty of a u.s.-led strike grew today, it was underscored by headlines like these. the "wall street journal" reporting u.s. allies are laying around for a strike against syria. fox is reporting u.s. forces could strike any time. there is the uncertainty of what will unleash from this sort of thing. desperate regime. of course bigtime defenders in russia
be here that we decided this weekend to also require the americas cup to celebrate -- to require the san francisco giants to have a play off game, the 49ers to play this weekend, the blue grass festival to be here, the parade, as well as the castro sea fair to coincide and welcome you in style. but i wanted to say a few words about the one thing that keeps me up as the head of the legislative body here in san francisco. the reason why i sit with many of our first responders on our city's disaster council, the reason why a few years ago chief white and i led almost a half a billion dollar bond campaign to rebuild the water, fire, and police infrastructure. about every six months i literally wake up in the middle of the night thinking about what would happen if a disaster struck our city. and i think about this and i think i have these nightmares really for three reasons. one, everyone who lives in san francisco knows that in 1906 we were hit not just by an earthquake, but by an earthquake that led to a fire that burned down literally every single neighborhood in the district that i curren
-asaad must leave office. so where is america's credibility? >> reporter: the white house says the administration intends to declassify and release intelligence information. why the white house believes it was a chemical attack. bill: will he seek congressional authority before a military strike? >> reporter: the white house says it's consulting with congress as the war powers act requires. kings out of town for recess but one congressman says the president should do mow. he says the president should be making the case to the american public and his administration should come to congress to explain their plans. the consequences are too great for congress to be brushed aside. the president has been speaking with foreign leaders including british prime minister david cameron. they discussed possible consequences from the international community to syria. martha: we are told that the military assets are already in place when and if president obama does decide to order a strike. here is defense secretary chuck hagel speaking about this to the bbc. >> leaders all over the world said
. america lives starts right now. bye-bye. and we begin with a fox news alert out of washington, where we do expect to be briefed by the state department on the crisis in syria and what is a growing indication that world powers are ready to act to stop the blood shed. welcome to america live. president obama is keeping in close contact with our allies to determine the next step. the united nations acknowledged some coined of substance was used in last week's attack. the u.s. is prepared to act and moving four navy destroyers in the region. each is capable of caring 90 tomahawk missiles and they have nuclear powered submarines at its disposal. and un inspectors were able to get to the site for a second time. earlier this month they were shot at while they were trying to do their job. this comes as a suspected chemical weapon's attack killed hundreds of people. families were woiped out. in the midst of all of the sorrow, a story of hope. a father was reunited with a son he thought was killed in a recent attack. >> and only image the joy and no translation needed. the father was overcomed and n
the u.s. having to explain all of this to america and people around the world. you can just sense that there's a new nervousness here. it seems as though they're opening up and realizing the fact that it's not really a question of this any more it's a question of when. that's causing the talk at least among some the ones i've been talking, if mood has changed considerably here on the ground, pierce. >> cnn has obtained this exclusive video from a direct hit from an alleged chemical weapons attack. i'll warn some of the viewers it's graphic and disturbing. tell us the latest mood, i guess that we'll pant to sense is what is president assad's reaction going to be likely to any strike that comes? >> that's a good question. probably doubtful that there will be any reaction at all but a lot will depend on what sort of military action is taken. if it's limited i doubt there would be any reaction at all. i was here in the city when the israeli struck a big weapons depot of the syrian military and a whole mountain was set on fire for several days and there was a lot of rhetoric but never
of america's worst charity when it comes to how much money they raise for dying children, and how little they actually spend on them. we're keeping them honest. the people that say not vaccinating their children is a matter of faith, putting everyone at risk of childhood diseases that we sometimes forget can kill. dr. sanjay gupta weighs in. >>> we begin with syria. the drums of war growing louder but tough questions what kind of military action it might be. defense secretary hagel says american forces are in his words ready to go if ordered to strike. four navy stier destroyers have targets within range of missiles. a number of submarines believed to be in the mediterranean. the obama administration is promising to release new intelligence shortly. speaking to members of the american legion today, vice president biden sounded 100% convinced. >> no one doubts that innocent men, women and children have been the victims of chemical we pops attacks in syria. and there is no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. >> there is ample evide
about poverty, racism militarism and violence, i heard all of those things resonate saying that america, the dream is not yet realized but we can in fact continue in the tradition. and ultimately we will get there. >> now to syria and the looming aspect of u.n. intervention. the u.n. security council began considering a british backed resolution, the u.n. is asking that a team on the ground in damascus be allowed to finish its investigation into an alleged chemical weapons attack. there is concern that russia will object to intervention but the state department says that vote or no vote it will not allow russia to stop action on syria. >> we see no avenue forward. given continued russian option to any meaningful council action on syria. therefore the united states will continue its utle consultations. attempts to act on syria have been blocked and we cannot allow diplomatic response to be blocked. >> the goal of any imr action in syria would be to block the chemical weapons use throughout the country. israel planes conducted a separate strike earlier this year. the syria military's comm
to death. >>> and dogs running wild in detroit. the new problem facing america's largest bankrupt city. >>> and honey booboo's big day. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> our second story outfront, the decision to go to war. president obama said tonight he has not yet determined whether or not to strike syria but he did lay out his justification for u.s. involvement. >> when you start talking about chemical weapons in a country that has the largest stock pile of chemical weapons in the world where over time their control over chemical weapons may erode, where they lied to terrorist organizations that have targeted the united states, then there is a
. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." >>> consider this on an issue as far reaching as same-sex marriage, does the individual have the power to make major policy changes? last week one man in new mexico decided to begin issuing couples. >> we dropped everything and ran over here, that's why he only has a tank top on. >> she came out to the kitchen and was like do you want to get married? and i was like funny, funny. >> by virtue of the authority vested in me by the state of new mexico i now pronounce you spouses for life. >> yesterday a state district judge declared same-sex marriage legal in new mexico, that ruling only applied to two additional counties, but today three more counties decided to issue same-sex marriage licenses, and so far hundreds of couples have obtained those licenses. here so discuss this is the
of a better term, to the american people? do the american people deserve an explanation before america decides to strike militarily and, two, should the president get congressional approval? >> yes. i think for sure the president has and needs to do more to address the american people about this and to be very specific -- and i haven't heard a lot of discussion about this. our national security interests are at stake for several reasons. one of the basic reasons is when the iranian regime and hezbollah, two entities, one a terrorist organization, one an actual country, the regime in iran, not only are plotting against us every day and want to bring us harm and we know that for sure, but they've done so in the past, especially in the case of hezbollah. the iranians tried to blow up a restaurant in washington, d.c., that would kill a lot of americans. so i think our national security interests are at stake. i think the president has and will make that clear. but in terms of a long debate in congress, simply to respond to a chemical weapons attack i think would take too long. we should have a lon
of a conflict, not because of supply and demand. america produces 10 million barrels of oil a day. we consume double that, but globally the world produces and uses 89 million barrels of oil a day, and 30% of that comes from the middle east. so it's oil traders, speculators who are to blame for driving up the price of oil. this week right now there is absolutely no supply problem on oil. today on twitter and facebook i've been asking you how would a spike in gas prices change your spending habits? on facebook canner ara writes, there would absolutely be less money for groceries and going out. the discretionary spending that supports my economy takes the first hit. this viewer said i would have to find a new job. i already have taken a pay cut and i'm low on cash now. the commute would exacerbate the costs. tweet us or leave us a question on facebook. maybe these increasing oil prices b which by the way has st this country in a recession in previous decades, might not be a bad thing. >>> detroit's bankruptcy has sent off a huge legal battle over pensions that it owes its workers. many other ame
means good for you for experimenting but maybe do more than add fries. is america still the burger king? and who makes your favorite burger. and "ac 360" is up next. >>> jessica, thanks. good evening everyone. with washington talking war, we'll talk about what military action against syria would actually mean to american interests, american lives and millions of syrians living and dying under a dictator. >> and part two of america's worst charity when it comes to how much money they raise for dying children, and how little they actually spend on them. we're keeping them honest. the people that say not vaccinating their children is a matter of faith, putting everyone at risk of childhood diseases that we sometimes forget can kill. dr. sanjay gupta ways in. >>> we begin with syria. the drums of war growing louder but tough questions what kind of military action it might be. defense secretary hagel says american forces are in his words ready to go if ordered to strike. four navy distroyers have targets within range of missiles. a number of submarines believed to be in the mediterranean. th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 205 (some duplicates have been removed)